What is Wet?

Wet Drug

sinemet online no prescription What is Wet Drug?

The term “wet” refers to marijuana laced with PCP. This is done to enhance the effects of both drugs.

go Wet Drugs: Lacing

Lacing is the act of adding one or more substances to another. There are some street drugs that are commonly laced with other drugs for various different reasons, but it mostly it is done to “bulk up,” or make stronger, the original substance especially if it is weak, like a weak strain of marijuana. Otherwise, lacing is done in order to sell other, cheaper drugs in the place of something more expensive. In order to maximize profitability many drugs are laced with drugs of similar physical and/or chemical properties. Drugs with similar chemical properties are used because they are less expensive, or easier to obtain.

People sometimes make their own wet drug with other substances so as to combine or alter the physiological or psychoactive effects. In that way, they make wet drugs because they are stronger and have more intense effects.

https://www.pillarandpost.com/aciclovir-tabletas-400-mg-dosis.html What is PCP?

PCP (phencyclidine) is considered to be a hallucinogen and has many of the same effects as LSD, but can be much more dangerous – it acts as a hallucinogen, stimulant, depressant, and anesthetic – all at the same time. In the 1950’s, PCP was investigated as an anesthetic, but due to its severe side effects, its development for human use was discontinued. PCP is known for causing violent behavior and serious physical reactions such as seizures, coma, and death. There is no way to predict who will have a bad reaction to the drug.

In its original state, PCP is a white crystalline powder. PCP is available in tablet, liquid, and powder forms and is either ingested orally or smoked by applying the liquid form to tobacco or marijuana cigarettes or by lacing these and other cigarettes, sometimes containing herbs such as mint or parsley, with PCP powder.

diclofenaco alter 50mg used Effects of PCP – “Wet”

Also called “wet” or “water,” PCP often causes you to feel detached, distant and estranged from your surroundings. People who use the wet drug experience numbness, slurred speech and loss of coordination accompanied by a sense of strength and invulnerability. Auditory hallucinations, image distortion, severe mood disorders, and amnesia may also occur. In some users, PCP may cause acute anxiety and a feeling of impending doom, in others paranoia and violent hostility, and in some it may produce a psychoses indistinguishable from schizophrenia. PCP use is associated with a number of risks and many believe it to be one of the most dangerous drugs of abuse. People on wet drug often have a blank stare, rapid and involuntary eye movements, and an exaggerated gait, or way of walking.

diclofenaco 12 5 mg PCP and Marijuana – Wet Drug

Smoking wet marijuana is very dangerous. Again, it is marijuana that has been soaked in PCP and therefore causes enhanced effects of this wet drug combination, causing serious and disturbing hallucinations. Therefore, this enhancement to the drug’s high comes at a very serious price: PCP is highly toxic to the body and can cause respiratory failure, cardiac arrest, as well as kidney failure and liver failure. Because it enters the bloodstream as well, this can cause permanent damage to the body.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

source site Sources:

go to site http://www.streetdrugs.org/

prednisolone 2 mg/kg em http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://rkproducts.net/alldaychemist-suhagra-online.html http://www.ask.com/

Jenkem Myth or Reality?

Jenkem Myth

Supposedly there is a somewhat new drug trend among adolescents looking for a cheap and legal high: Jenkem. Supposedly a hallucinogenic inhalant that is made from fermented human waste. In the mid-1990s, it was reported to be a popular street drug among Zambian street children.

Is this really going on here in American schools and homes? There was a short-lived media frenzy about the Jenkem myth back in November of 2007; American media reports made false claims that Jenkem was a popular drug in American schools. Other sources had found that American media coverage on Jenkem was based on a hoax and on unreliable Internet research.

roxithromycin 600mg 4ml The Jenkem Myth or Reality: Origins

The name derives from Genkem, a brand of glues that had become the general term for all the glues abused children in South Africa. In the book Children of AIDS: Africa’s Orphan Crisis by Emma Guest, Jenkem is described as “fermented human sewage, scraped from pipes and stored in plastic bags for a week or so, until it gives off numbing, intoxicating fumes.” A BBC article from 1999 also documented the process as well as an IPS report from 1995.

prednisolone winthrop 20 mg posologie Jenkem Myth or Reality: What Effects Does It Cause?

Jenkem is inhaled and it effects can last for around an hour. The Jenkem user experiences auditory and visual hallucinations. It has been described as more potent than marijuana. An anesthesia specialist in Boston conducted a study on the effects of “sewer gas,” or technically hydrogen sulfide gas, on mice and compared it to holding one’s breath, choking, or inhaling gases from Jenkem, stating that it results in hypoxia, or a lack of oxygen flow to the body, which could explain the euphoria reported by users. The specialist also noted that this is physically dangerous.

triamterene overdose 800mg Jenkem Myth or Reality: Jenkem Use in America

Back in 2007, the Sheriff’s Department of Collier County, Florida issued an internal bulletin about Jenkem after finding a blog forum post, which included photos making and using Jenkem. After the bulletin went out, the original poster admitted that it was a hoax. About a month later, the United States Drug Enforcement Agency said they could not confirm any reports of Jenkem use.

http://ppuformat.pl/levitra-20mg-tablets.html Jenkem Myth: Further Findings

Snopes.com first classified stories of American use of Jenkem as “undetermined,” but soon after found such claims to be false, with its conclusion being that in fact, the Jenkem myth is just that – an urban legend in America, at least source link .  The site About.com also found that Jenkem reports were based upon unreliable Internet research. And as a tongue-in-cheek response, the site The Smoking Gun stated that the Collier county bulletin on the Jenkem myth as reality may be full of shit.” And yet another drug research site called Erowid stated that the Jenkem claims which had been circulating in the American media were the strange result of a hoax. http://mycoolhobbies.com/benfotiamine-price-of.html

http://microlab.de/index.php/imagefilm So, is Jenkem Myth or Reality?

It seems that Jenkem use is a sad reality in some underdeveloped parts of the world, namely some African regions. Luckily, Jenkem is not a trend that has caught on here in the U.S.

lithium klonopin 4mg  

ditropan 2mg 25i-nbome  

http://www.kayisisatis.com/cheapest-cialis-online-canada.html  

finasteride (proscar) 5 mg tablet  

can i buy doxycycline in mexico  

buy betnovate 0.1 cream over the counter uk  

follow  

 

 

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://www.snopes.com/

http://about.com/

What are Molly Moonrocks?

What are Molly Moonrocks?

What are Molly Moonrocks?

Molly Moonrocks Inside Capsules

Chances are if you are a part of the rave scene or even just a normal human being now days you have heard of molly. It is talked about in songs, on the news, it’s mentioned in movies and so on and so forth. As we all know molly is a street name for pure MDMA, but what about molly moonrocks? Supposedly this molly moonrocks are just molly in a different form, rocks as opposed to powder, and they are the newest and best thing to be seen and used by “rollers” and “ravers” to date.

So as we said before molly is the street name for pure MDMA standing for molecule. Molly is different than ecstasy pills or “E” because it comes powder form or in clear capsules that are touted to be more clean or pure in comparison to ecstasy pills.

Molly’s effects on its users can vary but generally they stay pretty much the same. For instance, in most molly users, molly starts to kick in about 45 minutes to an hour after taking it and its peak effects start to kick in at about two to three hours. After the peak molly kind of stables off and the effects last about two to three more hours and then there is a comedown. Molly has intense euphoric effects that make it very appealing to its users:

•             An alteration in consciousness

•             A strong sense of inner peace and self-acceptance

•             Diminished fear, anxiety, and insecurity

•             Diminished aggression, hostility, and jealousy

•             Feelings of intimacy and love for others

•             Feelings of empathy, compassion and forgiveness towards others

•             Increased energy and endurance

•             Mild psychedelic, mental imagery and auditory and visual distortions or hallucinations

•             Improved self confidence

•             Increased drive, desire and motivation

•             The ability to talk about normally anxiety provoking issues

•             An intensification of all bodily senses

•             Stimulation, arousal and enhancement of appreciation of music

So if molly does all of this what do molly moonrocks do? Molly moonrocks take everything that molly does and supposedly times that by about 100. There really isn’t any concrete evidence about molly moonrocks just what is known from people who have used it. According to some users of molly moonrocks, it is way more potent than just plain old molly. Which makes you have to ask the question what is in it then? According to some users of molly moonrocks, they say molly moonrocks are like the uncrushed form of molly. Molly moonrocks are essentially molly before it is cut and broken down into powder form. This makes molly moonrocks actually the MOST pure form of MDMA on the streets today.

So why the name molly moonrocks if it is just purer molly? Well because it comes in the form of rocks not powder like molly. Molly moonrocks have a yellow or tan tint to them and look like chunks of rock candy or if you want to be really creative moon rocks. To take molly moonrocks it is most common to put a little pebble of it on your tongue and let it dissolve. This will then cause the effects as mentioned above except they are supposed to be more intense.

The actual term moonrock has been around for long than molly has believe it or not. Moonrock according to most people is a slang name for the mixture of crack and heroin. In fact there is so little known about molly moonrocks that whatever it is it has rarely been heard of except in the crack and heroin form.

Natasha Lyonne: Addiction and Recovery

Natasha Lyonne: Addiction and Recovery

natasha lyonne addiction and recovery

Before Lindsay Lohan and Amanda Bynes, there was Natasha Lyonne. In hipster-speak, she was the original modern celebrity train wreck before it was popular.

You may remember her for her roles in the first American Pie movie and Slums of Beverly Hills or you may have only heard of her more recently, with her critically-acclaimed role in the Netflix original series, Orange is the New Black, which is likely considering her long hiatus from the Hollywood spotlight while she plunged into hardcore addiction.

A Short Bio

Natasha Lyonne was born in New York City and attended a Jewish prep school on the Upper East Side. Her parents signed her to Ford as a child model, where Lindsay later got her start, too, and, when she was 6 years old, Lyonne got her first big break, as Opal on “Pee-wee’s Playhouse.” Although acting was not something she originally wanted to pursue, Lyonne nonetheless became one of the rare child stars to successfully transition to adult roles.

Natasha Lyonne and Addiction

Natasha Lyonne was using both heroin and alcohol like it was going out of style. Like many in the grips of drug addiction, Lyonne began to experience legal consequences. In August 2001, she was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol after she ran her rented automobile onto a Miami Beach sidewalk, hitting a road sign and causing minor damages. A year later, she pleaded guilty to drunk driving and paid $1,000 in fines and court fees, performed 50 hours of community service, was placed on probation for one year and had her license suspended, also for a year.

Beginning in 2003, actor and landlord to Natasha Lyonne, Michael Rapaport, tried to evict her after numerous complaints by other tenants about her erratic and violent behavior. Then, in December 2004, Lyonne was arrested after verbally threatening her neighbor, breaking into the neighbor’s apartment, and making threats to molest the neighbor’s dog. In April 2005, an arrest warrant was issued for Lyonne for failure to appear in court on the charges.

Natasha Lyonne Hospitalization and Drug Treatment

In July 2005, Natasha Lyonne was admitted to Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan, and after a month-long stay, was transported to Bellevue Hospital. She was suffering from hepatitis C, a heart infection, and a collapsed lung. In 2006, Lyonne was admitted to a drug and alcohol treatment center called the Caron Foundation, and appeared in court after missing several court dates to face earlier charges of mischief, trespass and harassment. In 2012, she underwent open heart surgery, from which she quickly recovered.

Natasha Lyonne and Recovery

Now 34 years old, Natasha Lyonne, is clean and sober, and is getting a second chance – which unfortunately is not always the case. After her brush with death and having to get open heart surgery at such a young age, Lyonne has recently kicked her last vice: cigarettes.

Lyonne is back at it with various projects, most notably, she stars in Orange is the New Black, which premiered in July. It’s based on a memoir by Piper Kerman, a highly educated middle-class woman who did 15 months for drug dealing and money laundering, and Lyonne draws on her own personal experiences with addiction and jail for her role as “the junkie philosopher.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://nypost.com/

DEA Bans Bath Salts

DEA Bans Bath Salts

Finally, the DEA bans Bath Salts. If you don’t know what they are, just know that they are a highly addictive and harmful class of drugs.

What are Bath Salts?

Bath Salts have nothing to do with real bath salts – or “jewelry cleaner,” “plant food,” or “phone screen cleaner” – all of which they’re also sometimes called. Bath Salts are snorted, injected, or mixed with food or drink.

Bath Salts are designer drugs, meaning man-made or synthetic substances, which contain synthetic chemicals that are similar to amphetamines. Exactly what chemicals are in the drugs isn’t known.

Most bath salts are MDPV, or methylenedioxypyrovalerone, although different chemical compounds are constantly being made by illegal street chemists. It is difficult to know exactly what is in bath salts because of the ever-changing concoction and because no tests have existed until recently. That’s changing now, as some tests have been developed for certain of chemicals known to be found in bath salts.

Are Bath Salts Addictive?

The chemicals in bath salts are now labeled as Schedule I drugs because they have been found to have no medical value and to have a high potential for abuse. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, incidents involving the use of bath salts have sparked thousands of calls to poison centers across the country.

What Effect Do Bath Salts Have?

Like other amphetamines, bath salts cause an elevated mood, heightened libido, euphoria, and loss of appetite.

Also like amphetamines, bath salts can negatively impact cardiac, renal and respiratory functions.

The effects of bath salts include agitation, paranoia, hallucinations, chest pain, increased pulse, high blood pressure, and suicidal thinking and behavior, which can last even after the high from the drug has dissipated. Sadly, there have been a few highly publicized suicides a few days after their known use.

The DEA Bans Bath Salts: Emergency Scheduling

In October of 2011, the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) exercised its emergency scheduling authority to control three synthetic stimulants (Mephedrone, 3,4 methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and Methylone) used to make products marketed as “bath salts” and “plant food.” This action makes possessing bath salts, selling bath salts, or any products that contain them, illegal in the United States, therefore the banning bath salts. This emergency action was necessary to prevent an imminent threat to the public safety. The temporary scheduling action remains in effect for at least one year while the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the DEA bans bath salts completely by further studying these chemicals.

 The DEA Bans Bath Salts: The Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act

The Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act of July 2012 makes it illegal to possess bath salts, to use bath salts, or to distribute many of the chemicals used to make bath salts, including Mephedrone and MDPV. Methylone, another chemical used in bath salts, is also under the DEA regulatory ban. Altogether, the DEA bans bath salts – over 26 chemicals – that have been found to be ingredients in synthetic drugs known as bath salts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/

http://www.justice.gov/

Adderall Drug Abuse

Adderall Drug Abuse

Adderall is a drug that is prescribed for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) because it improves focus and stamina with mental tasks. A Schedule II drug, Adderall is in the same category as cocaine, because of its highly addictive properties. Adderall is basically a legal form of methamphetamines. Adderall is a central nervous stimulant and can be extremely addictive, leading to Adderall drug abuse.

The Homework Pill, The Study Drug

With nicknames like the Homework Pill and the Study Drug, it seems like using Adderall is a harmless practice to get into if you just want to get an edge in school or college courses. But Adderall is basically like prescription crystal meth or cocaine. It is highly addictive and, even if you have ‘good’ intentions to start using Adderall, it can quickly become a problem. Casual and occasional Adderall use has a nasty habit of turning into a nasty habit: you will find yourself on the wrong end of it and in the zone of Adderall drug abuse.

Accessibility of Adderall

Adderall can be obtained from any pharmacy with a prescription from a family doctor or specialist such as a psychiatrist. Obtaining an Adderall prescription is relatively easy: health care professionals rely on self-reporting from their patients in order to diagnose ADHD, often times by having the patient fill out a questionnaire.

The Face of Adderall Drug Abuse

If you are resorting to buying pills from others, stealing, or lying to get Adderall, then this should be a red flag that you have crossed over into Adderall drug abuse.

It is quite easy to get a prescription for Adderall from a doctor. First of all, many doctors’ offices are managed like an assembly line in a factory. Patients rarely even talk directly with their doctor during their appointment or, if they do get to see the doctor, it is for a very limited amount of time. Too many doctors are quick to simply write a prescription and send patients on their way.

People seeking prescriptions for Adderall simply need to familiarize themselves with what the symptoms of ADHD are, which can be done by talking to friends or surfing the net. Then, during their appointment they lie, telling their doctor how they are easily distracted, have difficulty concentrating, and struggle with procrastination. These symptoms are not easily measured so doctors just go by what the patient reports.

For those without a prescription, Adderall is quite easy to obtain. High school and college students either buy it from their classmates who have a diagnosis of ADHD or ADD and who have legitimate prescriptions for Adderall. Others may resort to stealing Adderall pills from family members who have been prescribed the drug and leave their bottles in easy-to-find places.

Dangers of Adderall Drug Abuse

While under the influence of Adderall, the user will experience a lack of appetite – leading to drastic and rapid weight loss – dry mouth, sweats, and anxiety. Adderall also increases blood pressure, causes irregular heartbeat, high body temperature, and cardiovascular failure, which can cause death. This can occur with the first use of the drug or after long term Adderall drug abuse.

Adderall use over time is incredibly dangerous can easily develop into Adderall drug abuse. Adderall addiction causes sleep disturbances and irregular sleep patterns, and insomnia. Lack of sleep can lead to psychosis.

Someone who is in the midst of Adderall drug abuse will suffer from a darkening mood, marked by depression, anxiety, irritability, mood swings, hostility and paranoia.

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://www.nytimes.com/

What is a high functioning drug addict?

What is a high functioning drug addict?

The term “high functioning drug addict” is really a misnomer. Someone suffering with an addiction is not really functioning at all – they just seem to be functioning on the outside; but really, on the inside, they are falling apart.

I feel like I have the authority to speak about this topic because I consider myself to have been a high functioning drug addict before getting clean.

Just a year ago, I was in the tight grip of full-blown addiction. I was an IV user and I would shoot anything I could get my hands on. My first drug of choice was heroin but I also liked to speedball: shooting cocaine or crack and heroin. By the end of my run, I was taking suboxone to keep the heroin withdrawals at bay but, like a true blue addict, I was shooting or smoking copious amounts of crack and abusing sleeping pills, Xanax, and barbiturates. Right now, you are probably picturing the ‘typical’ image of a junkie: strung-out, half-naked, greasy hair, track-marked girl with dark circles under her eyes and passed out next to a dumpster or something. But that wasn’t the case. I was a high functioning drug addict.

Let me explain…

I was a college graduate with two degrees living in a nice neighborhood. I had my own car and a steady job with one of the top-five banking institutions in the country. Despite my tattoos and rapid weight loss,  physically I didn’t ‘look like a junkie.’ In fact, friends and acquaintances with which I shared that I used to shoot drugs (I was still using, I was just in so much denial that I would talk about my use in the past tense) would all respond in the same way: “you don’t look like a junkie.” To a sick girl like me, that was the ultimate compliment. And the green light to keep going, head-first into the turmoil of addiction.

Being a high functioning drug addict means living two lives: one that you reveal to others – your “perfect life” with the job, the house, the car, the family; and your secret life – the drugs, the stealing, the desperation. It is as if I was living a secret dual-life. One of productivity marked with high-achievement like job promotions, while my other life was one of escape through drugs. I was able to succeed in my life well enough to where the effects of my addiction had not impacted the life I projected to others.

Like me, other high functioning drug addicts may have been able to avoid serious trouble professionally or personally so far but it is only a matter of time before their addiction will lead to severe problems and consequences. Many of us in recovery call this “the big yet.” For example, I was lucky enough to avoid catching any legal charges, such as possession, in my addiction but, I am clear that, if I had continued to use, that I would eventually get into trouble with the law. I mean, come on, I worked at a major bank and was in charge of large sums of money on a daily basis. I was also feeding a very expensive drug habit. I never stole money from my job…yet. I’m clear that it would have happened eventually and that would mean a felony charge. I decided to get clean because I was not willing to let it get that bad.

I think, in some ways, being a high functioning drug addict is trickier than being the typical down-and-out junkie. A huge part of addiction is denial; it affects everyone who abuses drugs and is the major road-block to getting clean. It’s like this, if you don’t think you have a problem, then why get help? And if you’re a high functioning drug addict, it’s quite easy to fool yourself that things are fine and that what you are doing is normal. You have all the evidence you need to convince yourself of this.

 

 

Sources:

Personal experience

http://www.lifeskillsauthorities.com/

Can You Shoot Alcohol?

Can You Shoot Alcohol?

When you shoot alcohol, it bypasses the metabolic processes in the stomach and is therefore introduced quickly to the central nervous system. Keep in mind that this is a dangerous practice.

I can’t really remember the last time I drank alcohol. Not because my memory is fuzzy, which from all the drug and alcohol abuse it is but, simply because I haven’t drank alcohol in a very long time. But I do remember the time I tried to shoot alcohol. Well, I should say, I remember the moments leading up to trying to shoot alcohol.

My quest for a high was quelled by heroin and cocaine. Don’t get me wrong, I used to drink. In fact, that’s how it all started for me: binge drinking on the weekends in high school. But, by the time I got to college, alcohol wasn’t “working” for me anymore. What I mean by that is, I only wanted to drink to get drunk but it seemed like my system was getting more and more sensitive to alcohol. It wasn’t your typical hangover, either. It’s like I developed an allergy to it. I couldn’t seem to drink enough to get drunk because the allergic reaction (headache, stomach ache) was uncomfortable enough to stop me from drinking any more.

Fast forward through discovering Tramadol, Vicodin, and Percocet and then graduating to IV heroin use. At this point, I am in full-on active addiction. Shooting heroin, cocaine, and crack on pretty much a daily basis. Alcohol? Pffft…child’s play.  I wasn’t at all interested in drinking because I had found my drugs of choice.

With my addiction was in full-swing, I would seek more and more drugs and combinations of drugs to achieve an even more intense high. One day in particular when I was already high on heroin and Xanax, I was eager to alter my state even more. I was home alone at my mom’s house and remembered she had an old bottle of brandy in one of the kitchen cabinets – she wasn’t a drinker either. I still wasn’t interested in drinking alcohol but I had heard that you could shoot alcohol. Desperate for a bigger fix, I drew up some of that in a needle and gave it a shot – no pun intended.

I can’t really say what happened next. I have no recollection. So, I guess it worked. It’s ironic though. You want to shoot alcohol to get a bigger buzz and you do but, you don’t get to remember it or even enjoy it. Instant blackout.

So, Can You Shoot Alcohol?

There really isn’t any chemical difference between drinking alcohol and injecting it. In both cases you have ethanol molecules flowing in your bloodstream. But there is a big difference in the time it takes to “hit you.” And because of the time difference you would need to be extremely careful in the amount injected. A mistake could be fatal.

Someone who is prone to doing drugs though IV use is more likely to try to shoot alcohol. This is because they have an addiction to the needle, itself. This was also the case for me: I was obsessed with what was in the needle but I was also obsessed with using a needle to administer my drugs.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.examiner.com/

www.thefix.com

http://blogs.howstuffworks.com/

 

 

Cocaine Overdose Symptoms

Cocaine Overdose Symptoms

Cocaine is a bitter, addictive pain blocker that is extracted from the leaves of Erythroxylon coca, also known as the coca scrub, a plant that comes from the Andean highlands in South America. Cocaine is the most powerful stimulant of natural origin. The name of “cocaine” came from the plant “coca”.

Cocaine overdose symptoms can come on suddenly, often with no advanced warning. Cocaine overdose symptoms may include seizures, tremors, and general shakiness. In those using the drug for the first time, often the substance will keep them awake for a long time. For others, there is less of an effect of being wide awake. Seizures and tremors can come on suddenly without warning, though they usually occur shortly after use.

Cocaine overdose symptoms: Behavioral

Some symptoms of cocaine overdose affect the individual’s behavior. Rapid speech, talking excessively, acting out violently, or having paranoid thoughts are all signs a person has used a substantial amount of the drug or is being severely affected. This is when others should be on the alert for more symptoms. It is also likely that when such states occur, the heart rate is also very high. Cocaine overdose can happen very quickly, so it is best to seek medical attention if a person’s behavior is different from ordinary. It is best not to confront a person exhibiting violent behavior or paranoid thoughts by trying to control the individual. This is likely to only agitate the person more and may lead to injury of others.

Cocaine Overdose Symptoms can cause permanent damage

Cocaine overdose can lead to permanent brain injury. This can occur either by causing a stroke or by causing severe seizures. The drug increases blood pressure and heart rate. Therefore, stroke and heart attack can occur at any time. In some people, sudden death due to cardiac arrest can occur the first time the substance is used. It is especially dangerous for those who already suffer from heart disease or high blood pressure, greatly increasing the risk of an adverse reaction with smaller amounts.

More cocaine overdose symptoms

Racing heart rate will occur just before nausea and vomiting. If vomiting occurs, it is important to make sure the individual is rolled onto his or her side to prevent choking, which is another hazard of cocaine overdose. Medical help should be sought immediately if vomiting occurs as this is a sign that more severe consequences may occur soon. Other risks from vomiting include dehydration and rupture of the esophagus, if vomiting is severe and lasts for a longer period of time.

The use of cocaine can lead to a high fever, due to increased muscle activity. When a high fever occurs, the individual may experience permanent damage to muscle cells. Permanent brain injury is also possible. Hyperthermia can also result in organ failure. If immediate medical attention is not sought, the failure can become permanent. Sometimes it occurs even with prompt medical attention. Knowing the signs and symptoms of cocaine overdose such as hyperthermia and high fever can alert friends and family members to the potential danger. Immediate medical attention is required for high fever.

What are the Good Samaritan Laws?

What are the Good Samaritan Laws?

 

Good Samaritan laws are laws or acts offering legal protection to people who give reasonable assistance to those who are injured, ill, in peril, or otherwise incapacitated. In some cases, Good Samaritan laws encourage people to offer assistance (duty to rescue). The protection is intended to reduce bystanders’ hesitation to assist, for fear of being sued or prosecuted for unintentional injury or wrongful death.

In the past, Good Samaritan laws did not protect individuals in emergency situations that involved drugs. For this reason, many people feared getting involved by calling 911 or transporting the overdose victim to the hospital. As a result, so many people have lost their lives when they could have been saved.

The Good Samaritan Emergency Response Act, an amendment to the law, signed just last year, encourages people to call 911 for help without having to fear criminal prosecution for drug possession because it grants them immunity.

Under this law, someone who’s overdosing on drugs or seeking help for an overdose victim can’t be prosecuted for having a small amount of heroin or any amount of marijuana, for example.

New Jersey

Recently, already-established Good Samaritan laws have been amended to protect individuals in rendering aid to the specific life-threatening situation: drug overdose. In these cases, someone who calls 911, stays at the scene, and/or bring someone to the Emergency Room when they are overdosing is immune to any drug-related charges. The same goes for the overdose victim.

The Good Samaritan Emergency Response Act was originally vetoed in November by Gov. Christie but, he changed his mind after talking with singer Bon Jovi and reading the letters of many grieving parents of overdose victims.

Now that the Act has passed, altruistic individuals who call 911 when a friend or neighbor is overdosing will not be liable for drug use or possession charges for calling the police.

In addition, the Act also provides Good Samaritan protection for anyone administering an opioid antidote to an overdose victim. Medics and even average citizens in New Jersey can use these opioid antidotes to aid overdose victims without fear of being sued.

This may help the state reverse the alarming trend that left 180 dead from opioid overdose alone in 2009, according to the Drug Policy Alliance.

Still, nothing in the bill prevents law enforcement from charging anyone with a drug crime using evidence that is unrelated to calling for medical aid.

New York

As for Bon Jovi, the singer/songwriter’s involvement in New Jersey’s Good Samaritan law follows his then-19-year-old daughter’s brush with a drug overdose in her college dorm room in New York in 2012.

New York’s Good Samaritan law for 911 callers allowed Bon Jovi’s daughter to be rescued by emergency responders and not charged with a drug crime.

Stephanie Rose Bongiovi, the 19-year-old daughter of rocker Jon Bon Jovi, was arrested after she allegedly overdosed on heroin. While police initially arrested Bongiovi and another student on suspicion of drug possession, those charges were later dropped.

Bongiovi could have faced misdemeanor charges for possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana, and criminal use of drug paraphernalia.

New York’s Good Samaritan 911 law is in place to ensure that those facing life-threatening drug overdoses call for help, instead of risking death over fear of being charged with a crime. That’s exactly what happened in Stephanie Rose Bongiovi’s case. Several other states also have similar Good Samaritan laws on the books.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://blogs.findlaw.com/

www.wikipedia.org