Jenkem Myth or Reality?

Jenkem Myth

Supposedly there is a somewhat new drug trend among adolescents looking for a cheap and legal high: Jenkem. Supposedly a hallucinogenic inhalant that is made from fermented human waste. In the mid-1990s, it was reported to be a popular street drug among Zambian street children.

Is this really going on here in American schools and homes? There was a short-lived media frenzy about the Jenkem myth back in November of 2007; American media reports made false claims that Jenkem was a popular drug in American schools. Other sources had found that American media coverage on Jenkem was based on a hoax and on unreliable Internet research.

forex trading accounts The Jenkem Myth or Reality: Origins

The name derives from Genkem, a brand of glues that had become the general term for all the glues abused children in South Africa. In the book Children of AIDS: Africa’s Orphan Crisis by Emma Guest, Jenkem is described as “fermented human sewage, scraped from pipes and stored in plastic bags for a week or so, until it gives off numbing, intoxicating fumes.” A BBC article from 1999 also documented the process as well as an IPS report from 1995.

follow Jenkem Myth or Reality: What Effects Does It Cause?

Jenkem is inhaled and it effects can last for around an hour. The Jenkem user experiences auditory and visual hallucinations. It has been described as more potent than marijuana. An anesthesia specialist in Boston conducted a study on the effects of “sewer gas,” or technically hydrogen sulfide gas, on mice and compared it to holding one’s breath, choking, or inhaling gases from Jenkem, stating that it results in hypoxia, or a lack of oxygen flow to the body, which could explain the euphoria reported by users. The specialist also noted that this is physically dangerous.

isoptin online thesaurus Jenkem Myth or Reality: Jenkem Use in America

Back in 2007, the Sheriff’s Department of Collier County, Florida issued an internal bulletin about Jenkem after finding a blog forum post, which included photos making and using Jenkem. After the bulletin went out, the original poster admitted that it was a hoax. About a month later, the United States Drug Enforcement Agency said they could not confirm any reports of Jenkem use.

nitrofurantoin 20mg dosierung Jenkem Myth: Further Findings

Snopes.com first classified stories of American use of Jenkem as “undetermined,” but soon after found such claims to be false, with its conclusion being that in fact, the Jenkem myth is just that – an urban legend in America, at least source link .  The site About.com also found that Jenkem reports were based upon unreliable Internet research. And as a tongue-in-cheek response, the site The Smoking Gun stated that the Collier county bulletin on the Jenkem myth as reality may be full of shit.” And yet another drug research site called Erowid stated that the Jenkem claims which had been circulating in the American media were the strange result of a hoax. viramune prescription assistance

meclizine 100mg 75mg So, is Jenkem Myth or Reality?

It seems that Jenkem use is a sad reality in some underdeveloped parts of the world, namely some African regions. Luckily, Jenkem is not a trend that has caught on here in the U.S.

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What are Molly Moonrocks?

click here What are Molly Moonrocks?

What are Molly Moonrocks?

Molly Moonrocks Inside Capsules

Chances are if you are a part of the rave scene or even just a normal human being now days you have heard of molly. It is talked about in songs, on the news, it’s mentioned in movies and so on and so forth. As we all know molly is a street name for pure MDMA, but what about molly moonrocks? Supposedly this molly moonrocks are just molly in a different form, rocks as opposed to powder, and they are the newest and best thing to be seen and used by “rollers” and “ravers” to date.

So as we said before molly is the street name for pure MDMA standing for molecule. Molly is different than ecstasy pills or “E” because it comes powder form or in clear capsules that are touted to be more clean or pure in comparison to ecstasy pills.

Molly’s effects on its users can vary but generally they stay pretty much the same. For instance, in most molly users, molly starts to kick in about 45 minutes to an hour after taking it and its peak effects start to kick in at about two to three hours. After the peak molly kind of stables off and the effects last about two to three more hours and then there is a comedown. Molly has intense euphoric effects that make it very appealing to its users:

•             An alteration in consciousness

•             A strong sense of inner peace and self-acceptance

•             Diminished fear, anxiety, and insecurity

•             Diminished aggression, hostility, and jealousy

•             Feelings of intimacy and love for others

•             Feelings of empathy, compassion and forgiveness towards others

•             Increased energy and endurance

•             Mild psychedelic, mental imagery and auditory and visual distortions or hallucinations

•             Improved self confidence

•             Increased drive, desire and motivation

•             The ability to talk about normally anxiety provoking issues

•             An intensification of all bodily senses

•             Stimulation, arousal and enhancement of appreciation of music

preço do xeloda 500mg So if molly does all of this what do molly moonrocks do? Molly moonrocks take everything that molly does and supposedly times that by about 100. There really isn’t any concrete evidence about molly moonrocks just what is known from people who have used it. According to some users of molly moonrocks, it is way more potent than just plain old molly. Which makes you have to ask the question what is in it then? According to some users of molly moonrocks, they say molly moonrocks are like the uncrushed form of molly. Molly moonrocks are essentially molly before it is cut and broken down into powder form. This makes molly moonrocks actually the MOST pure form of MDMA on the streets today.

here So why the name molly moonrocks if it is just purer molly? Well because it comes in the form of rocks not powder like molly. Molly moonrocks have a yellow or tan tint to them and look like chunks of rock candy or if you want to be really creative moon rocks. To take molly moonrocks it is most common to put a little pebble of it on your tongue and let it dissolve. This will then cause the effects as mentioned above except they are supposed to be more intense.

The actual term moonrock has been around for long than molly has believe it or not. Moonrock according to most people is a slang name for the mixture of crack and heroin. In fact there is so little known about molly moonrocks that whatever it is it has rarely been heard of except in the crack and heroin form.

Adderall Drug Abuse

Adderall Drug Abuse

Adderall is a drug that is prescribed for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) because it improves focus and stamina with mental tasks. A Schedule II drug, Adderall is in the same category as cocaine, because of its highly addictive properties. Adderall is basically a legal form of methamphetamines. Adderall is a central nervous stimulant and can be extremely addictive, leading to Adderall drug abuse.

The Homework Pill, The Study Drug

With nicknames like the Homework Pill and the Study Drug, it seems like using Adderall is a harmless practice to get into if you just want to get an edge in school or college courses. But Adderall is basically like prescription crystal meth or cocaine. It is highly addictive and, even if you have ‘good’ intentions to start using Adderall, it can quickly become a problem. Casual and occasional Adderall use has a nasty habit of turning into a nasty habit: you will find yourself on the wrong end of it and in the zone of Adderall drug abuse.

Accessibility of Adderall

Adderall can be obtained from any pharmacy with a prescription from a family doctor or specialist such as a psychiatrist. Obtaining an Adderall prescription is relatively easy: health care professionals rely on self-reporting from their patients in order to diagnose ADHD, often times by having the patient fill out a questionnaire.

The Face of Adderall Drug Abuse

If you are resorting to buying pills from others, stealing, or lying to get Adderall, then this should be a red flag that you have crossed over into Adderall drug abuse.

It is quite easy to get a prescription for Adderall from a doctor. First of all, many doctors’ offices are managed like an assembly line in a factory. Patients rarely even talk directly with their doctor during their appointment or, if they do get to see the doctor, it is for a very limited amount of time. Too many doctors are quick to simply write a prescription and send patients on their way.

People seeking prescriptions for Adderall simply need to familiarize themselves with what the symptoms of ADHD are, which can be done by talking to friends or surfing the net. Then, during their appointment they lie, telling their doctor how they are easily distracted, have difficulty concentrating, and struggle with procrastination. These symptoms are not easily measured so doctors just go by what the patient reports.

For those without a prescription, Adderall is quite easy to obtain. High school and college students either buy it from their classmates who have a diagnosis of ADHD or ADD and who have legitimate prescriptions for Adderall. Others may resort to stealing Adderall pills from family members who have been prescribed the drug and leave their bottles in easy-to-find places.

Dangers of Adderall Drug Abuse

While under the influence of Adderall, the user will experience a lack of appetite – leading to drastic and rapid weight loss – dry mouth, sweats, and anxiety. Adderall also increases blood pressure, causes irregular heartbeat, high body temperature, and cardiovascular failure, which can cause death. This can occur with the first use of the drug or after long term Adderall drug abuse.

Adderall use over time is incredibly dangerous can easily develop into Adderall drug abuse. Adderall addiction causes sleep disturbances and irregular sleep patterns, and insomnia. Lack of sleep can lead to psychosis.

Someone who is in the midst of Adderall drug abuse will suffer from a darkening mood, marked by depression, anxiety, irritability, mood swings, hostility and paranoia.

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://www.nytimes.com/

What is a high functioning drug addict?

What is a high functioning drug addict?

The term “high functioning drug addict” is really a misnomer. Someone suffering with an addiction is not really functioning at all – they just seem to be functioning on the outside; but really, on the inside, they are falling apart.

I feel like I have the authority to speak about this topic because I consider myself to have been a high functioning drug addict before getting clean.

Just a year ago, I was in the tight grip of full-blown addiction. I was an IV user and I would shoot anything I could get my hands on. My first drug of choice was heroin but I also liked to speedball: shooting cocaine or crack and heroin. By the end of my run, I was taking suboxone to keep the heroin withdrawals at bay but, like a true blue addict, I was shooting or smoking copious amounts of crack and abusing sleeping pills, Xanax, and barbiturates. Right now, you are probably picturing the ‘typical’ image of a junkie: strung-out, half-naked, greasy hair, track-marked girl with dark circles under her eyes and passed out next to a dumpster or something. But that wasn’t the case. I was a high functioning drug addict.

Let me explain…

I was a college graduate with two degrees living in a nice neighborhood. I had my own car and a steady job with one of the top-five banking institutions in the country. Despite my tattoos and rapid weight loss,  physically I didn’t ‘look like a junkie.’ In fact, friends and acquaintances with which I shared that I used to shoot drugs (I was still using, I was just in so much denial that I would talk about my use in the past tense) would all respond in the same way: “you don’t look like a junkie.” To a sick girl like me, that was the ultimate compliment. And the green light to keep going, head-first into the turmoil of addiction.

Being a high functioning drug addict means living two lives: one that you reveal to others – your “perfect life” with the job, the house, the car, the family; and your secret life – the drugs, the stealing, the desperation. It is as if I was living a secret dual-life. One of productivity marked with high-achievement like job promotions, while my other life was one of escape through drugs. I was able to succeed in my life well enough to where the effects of my addiction had not impacted the life I projected to others.

Like me, other high functioning drug addicts may have been able to avoid serious trouble professionally or personally so far but it is only a matter of time before their addiction will lead to severe problems and consequences. Many of us in recovery call this “the big yet.” For example, I was lucky enough to avoid catching any legal charges, such as possession, in my addiction but, I am clear that, if I had continued to use, that I would eventually get into trouble with the law. I mean, come on, I worked at a major bank and was in charge of large sums of money on a daily basis. I was also feeding a very expensive drug habit. I never stole money from my job…yet. I’m clear that it would have happened eventually and that would mean a felony charge. I decided to get clean because I was not willing to let it get that bad.

I think, in some ways, being a high functioning drug addict is trickier than being the typical down-and-out junkie. A huge part of addiction is denial; it affects everyone who abuses drugs and is the major road-block to getting clean. It’s like this, if you don’t think you have a problem, then why get help? And if you’re a high functioning drug addict, it’s quite easy to fool yourself that things are fine and that what you are doing is normal. You have all the evidence you need to convince yourself of this.

 

 

Sources:

Personal experience

http://www.lifeskillsauthorities.com/

Can You Shoot Alcohol?

Can You Shoot Alcohol?

When you shoot alcohol, it bypasses the metabolic processes in the stomach and is therefore introduced quickly to the central nervous system. Keep in mind that this is a dangerous practice.

I can’t really remember the last time I drank alcohol. Not because my memory is fuzzy, which from all the drug and alcohol abuse it is but, simply because I haven’t drank alcohol in a very long time. But I do remember the time I tried to shoot alcohol. Well, I should say, I remember the moments leading up to trying to shoot alcohol.

My quest for a high was quelled by heroin and cocaine. Don’t get me wrong, I used to drink. In fact, that’s how it all started for me: binge drinking on the weekends in high school. But, by the time I got to college, alcohol wasn’t “working” for me anymore. What I mean by that is, I only wanted to drink to get drunk but it seemed like my system was getting more and more sensitive to alcohol. It wasn’t your typical hangover, either. It’s like I developed an allergy to it. I couldn’t seem to drink enough to get drunk because the allergic reaction (headache, stomach ache) was uncomfortable enough to stop me from drinking any more.

Fast forward through discovering Tramadol, Vicodin, and Percocet and then graduating to IV heroin use. At this point, I am in full-on active addiction. Shooting heroin, cocaine, and crack on pretty much a daily basis. Alcohol? Pffft…child’s play.  I wasn’t at all interested in drinking because I had found my drugs of choice.

With my addiction was in full-swing, I would seek more and more drugs and combinations of drugs to achieve an even more intense high. One day in particular when I was already high on heroin and Xanax, I was eager to alter my state even more. I was home alone at my mom’s house and remembered she had an old bottle of brandy in one of the kitchen cabinets – she wasn’t a drinker either. I still wasn’t interested in drinking alcohol but I had heard that you could shoot alcohol. Desperate for a bigger fix, I drew up some of that in a needle and gave it a shot – no pun intended.

I can’t really say what happened next. I have no recollection. So, I guess it worked. It’s ironic though. You want to shoot alcohol to get a bigger buzz and you do but, you don’t get to remember it or even enjoy it. Instant blackout.

So, Can You Shoot Alcohol?

There really isn’t any chemical difference between drinking alcohol and injecting it. In both cases you have ethanol molecules flowing in your bloodstream. But there is a big difference in the time it takes to “hit you.” And because of the time difference you would need to be extremely careful in the amount injected. A mistake could be fatal.

Someone who is prone to doing drugs though IV use is more likely to try to shoot alcohol. This is because they have an addiction to the needle, itself. This was also the case for me: I was obsessed with what was in the needle but I was also obsessed with using a needle to administer my drugs.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.examiner.com/

www.thefix.com

http://blogs.howstuffworks.com/

 

 

What are whip its?

What are Whip Its?

With the hospitalization of Demi Moore last year from reportedly having “seizure-like” symptoms due to nitrous oxide; whip its have been making a comeback. Whip its, or nitrous oxide canisters can be bought at Wal-Mart or in any kitchen section as well as in head shops. Nitrous oxide could just be extracted for a Reddi-Whip can too. Most people use the nitrous oxide canisters to make whipped cream, people who want to party though, inhale them for a very brief but very euphoric high.

So what is nitrous oxide? (Better known as whip its)

Nitrous oxide is characterized as an inhalant drug, used by those who like to “huff” chemicals. This would be better known as inhalant abuse. What nitrous oxide or as it is called by those who abuse it “whip its” do is they give a quick high that is accompanied by dizziness, a lack of coordination, and slurred speech. Since the effect of whip its is very brief many users tend to inhale it again and again, and this increases the euphoric effects.

One of the other slang terms for whip its is hippie crack. Whip its can be sold in small individual canisters or by entire tanks. Whip its are legal to purchase although illegal in many states if you plan to use them as a recreational drug which is why whip its are regulated by the Food and Drug administration and not the Drug Enforcement Agency. Nitrous oxide or whip its as a drug comes in many forms of inhalants including solvents and gasoline.

Like most drugs of course, whip its are not good for you. Whip its can cause hearing loss, liver and kidney damage, limb spasms, central nervous system or brain damage, brain marrow damage, heart failure, and suffocation. There is even a syndrome associated with whip its known as the “sudden sniffing death” or put simply “sudden death”. Whip its also can cause side effects that are very similar to frostbite.

And who uses whip its?

Young people seem to be drawn to inhalants in general just because they are so easy to obtain and can be found around the house. Whip its fall into that because they are so widely available. In 2011, 719,000 people aged 12 or older reported using inhalants for the first time within the prior twelve months according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Most of those users were under the age of18 when they first tried whip its. The average age for first use of whip its is around 16. A lot of the times whip its are sold in balloons at rock concerts.

Dentists also use “whip its” or rather nitrous oxide and if you are familiar with nitrous oxide you probably know it as laughing gas if you have never done a whip it. Whip its though aren’t quite the same as what you get at the dentist’s office. At the dentist’s office the dentist carefully monitors the amount of oxygen mixed in with the nitrous to make sure it’s safe.  Here is a fun fact though: many dental associations have been formed to make treatment programs for dentists who get addicted to their own nitrous oxide.

Whip its may seem like fun and they may seem especially safe because they are so easy to buy and get but the truth is whip its are really dangerous and can lead many people into an addiction they don’t know how to get out of.

Hallucinogens in Addiction Treatment

Hallucinogens in Addiction Treatment

Treating Drug Abuse with…Drugs?

An up-and-coming approach to treating drug abuse is the use of hallucinogens in addiction treatment. Specifically, researchers are looking to Ibogaine, a natural hallucinogen that has been used for centuries in other parts of the world for ritual ceremonies. Currently, Ibogaine is being used in some European countries and Mexico for the treatment of drug addiction.

What are Hallucinogens?

Hallucinogenic compounds found in some plants and mushrooms (or their extracts) have been used—mostly during religious rituals—for centuries. Almost all hallucinogens contain nitrogen and are classified as alkaloids. Many hallucinogens have chemical structures similar to those of natural neurotransmitters. While the exact mechanisms by which hallucinogens exert their effects remain unclear, research suggests that these drugs work, at least partially, by temporarily interfering with neurotransmitter action or by binding to their receptor sites.

Using Hallucinogens in Addiction Treatment

Ibogaine, is a naturally occurring psychoactive substance found in plants. A hallucinogen with both psychedelic and dissociative properties, the substance is banned in some countries; in other countries it is being used to treat addiction to methadone, heroin, alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, and other drugs. Derivatives of ibogaine that lack the substance’s hallucinogenic properties are under development.

And scientists say Ibogaine might be the best way to break drug addicts of their habit.

Ibogaine has intrigued researchers since 1962, when Howard Lotsof, a student at New York University and an opiate addict, found that a single dose erased his drug cravings without causing any withdrawal symptoms. Unfortunately, the hallucinogen can increase the risk of cardiac arrest, and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency lists it as a Schedule I substance, a classification for drugs like ecstasy and LSD with “no known medical value” and “high potential for abuse,” making it difficult to get federal funding to run clinical trials. That is, currently it is not legal to use hallucinogens in addiction treatment.

Animal tests have shown the drug’s medicinal promise. “Rats addicted to morphine will quit for weeks after receiving ibogaine,” says Stanley Glick, the director of the Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience at Albany Medical College. And addicts have reported positive effects in Mexico and Europe, where ibogaine therapy is legal.

From the limited research, though, scientists have two theories about how the use of hallucinogens in addiction treatment works. Some say it’s purely biological—that ibogaine degrades into a compound that binds with opiate receptors in the brain to quiet cravings. Others believe that it is also psychological. Those who use hallucinogens report a change in perspective and outlook on life. Researchers believe that this aspect of the hallucination provides perspective on the negative aspects of drug use, and so the drug addict will strive to quit.

The Argument for the use of Hallucinogens in Addiction Treatment

Regardless of the mechanism, proving ibogaine works is essential to winning approval and funding for clinical trials of using hallucinogens in addiction treatment. And, in the U.S., the sooner the better: Nearly seven million Americans abuse illicit drugs, costing the nation an estimated $181 billion a year in health care, crime and lost productivity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugabuse.gov

http://www.popsci.com

www.wikipedia.org

Meth Overdose Symptoms

Meth Overdose Symptoms

Meth or methamphetamine is a central nervous system stimulant. Meth is a strong form of a stimulant that is illicitly sold on the streets. Meth is usually a white crystal-like powder, called “crystal meth”.

The meth powder can be snorted up the nose, smoked, swallowed or dissolved in water and injected into a vein. A meth overdose can result from any of these methods of ingestion. A meth overdose may be intentional or unintentional, and it may occur in users taking the meth for rare legitimate purposes or in those misusing the drug.

A meth overdose is most common in users who are injecting the meth, and first-time meth users who have no tolerance and are injecting the drug are particularly at risk. Meth is very rarely found in its pure form, so a meth overdose may also result from a reaction to the chemicals added to the drug. Because of this, meth overdose is possible even from a non-lethal dose, as users may be unable to accurately judge the amount of crystal meth they are actually consuming.

A meth overdose is also known as: Intoxication – amphetamines; Intoxication – uppers; Amphetamine intoxication; Uppers overdose; Overdose – methamphetamine; Crank overdose; Meth overdose; Crystal meth overdose; Speed overdose; Ice overdose

 A meth overdose can happen two ways: It can either be acute (sudden) or chronic (long term).

  • An acute meth overdose occurs when someone accidentally or intentionally takes too much meth and has side effects which can be life threatening.
  • A chronic meth overdose refers to health effects seen in someone who uses meth on a very regular basis.

What are the meth overdose symptoms?

Meth most often causes a general feeling of wellness or euphoria that is usually called a “rush” by its users. This rush of euphoria is why many people get addicted to meth or want to do meth in the first place. Meth can also cause symptoms such as increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, and large wide/dilated pupils.

If someone takes a large amount of meth they could end up overdosing on the drug. If someone overdoses on meth they will have meth overdose symptoms. Meth overdose symptoms are but are not limited to:

  • Agitation
  • Chest pain
  • Heart attack
  • Heart stops entirely
  • Coma (in extreme cases)
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Kidney damage and possibly kidney failure
  • Paranoia
  • Seizures
  • Severe stomach pain
  • Stroke

Long term use of meth can lead to significant psychological problems which would be or can be caused by an over use or over dose on meth over a long period of time. Here are some meth overdose symptoms that are apparent from a total over use of meth.

  • Severe inability to sleep (insomnia)
  • Major mood swings
  • Delusional behavior
  • Extreme paranoia

Other meth overdose symptoms may include but are not limited to:

  • Repeated infections
  • Missing and rotted teeth (called “meth mouth“)
  • Heart attack
  • Severe weight loss
  • Skin sores (boils)
  • Stroke

What do you do if someone has meth overdose symptoms?

If you think that someone has taken meth and they are having meth overdose symptoms, immediately get them medical help. Take extreme caution around someone who is having meth overdose symptoms especially if they seem to be extremely excited or paranoid.

Source:

http://www.projectknow.com/research/crystal-meth-overdose/

 

Xanax Withdrawal Symptoms

Xanax Withdrawal Symptoms

Xanax is the name brand of the medication known as Alprazolam. Xanax falls into the category of medications known as benzodiazepines. The street term for these types of medications is “benzos”. Xanax as a benzodiazepine is used medically for the treatment of anxiety, panic disorders, and seizures. Even though Xanax is usually prescribed to patients with an anxiety disorder, Xanax is used recreationally for its euphoric effects.

The side-effects of recreational Xanax use generally consist of feelings of well-being, euphoria, loss of inhibition, loss of memory and drowsiness. Once a Xanax user has developed a tolerance some users describe becoming more social, outgoing or feeling as if they are on a stimulant such as cocaine. Some of the adverse or negative effects of Xanax use consist of mania, rage or aggression, twitches and hyperactivity.

It is extremely easy to build a tolerance to Xanax and a user may find themselves needing more to continue getting the desired effect after a very short period of time. This is because Xanax binds to the benzodiazepine receptors in the brain creating a build-up of alprazolam within the user; also Xanax has a rapid onset. In other words, the effects of Xanax are felt only 30 minutes after taking the drug and only last a short amount of time creating a want to use more.

The comedown after a brief period of use is not extremely unpleasant but the user will want to regain the positive effects of the drug once again after only a short period of time creating a pattern of habitual use and a tolerance.

If a user has begun a habitual use and needs more and more Xanax to continue getting the same effect they are probably now physically dependent or addicted. Once a physical dependence or addiction on Xanax has been established any kind of rapid cessation of use will cause Xanax withdrawal symptoms.

Xanax withdrawal symptoms, much like alcohol, can be fatal. Xanax withdrawal symptoms can begin within 12 hours of stopping use and will start to peak at around 3-4 days. Some general Xanax withdrawal symptoms consist of but are not limited to:

  • • Malaise
  • • Weakness
  • • Tachycardia (An erratic heartbeat)
  • • Lightheadedness
  • • Dizziness
  • • Anxiety
  • • Panic
  • • Hallucination
  • • Insomnia
  • • Moodiness
  • • Tremors
  • • Convulsion
  • • Nightmares
  • • Nausea
  • • Vomiting

The most serious (but more rare) Xanax withdrawal symptom is convulsion – and these can be life threatening. More common Xanax withdrawal symptoms are psychological in nature, and are very unpleasant.

Problematically, Xanax withdrawal symptoms usually lead the user back to Xanax use rather than continue to push through the Xanax withdrawal symptoms continuing the addiction rather than trying to stop. Xanax withdrawal symptoms are very unpleasant and it is always best to seek medical attention from a detox facility if a user is experiencing any of these symptoms. Just as with alcohol withdrawal symptoms; Xanax withdrawal symptoms can end up being fatal so it is highly recommended that a user find a safe medical detox facility where they can be under a 24 hour watch while withdrawing.

Also Xanax withdrawal symptoms are extremely uncomfortable if not fatal and a detox facility can provide the comfort and care to keep the user from returning to Xanax use once again.

What is Tramadol?

What is Tramadol?

Tramadol is a narcotic like pain reliever that is used to treat moderate to severe pain. Tramadol is an extended release drug that is used to treat moderate to severe chronic pain when pain relief is needed around the clock or in other words for long periods of time.

The brand name for tramadol is Ultram. Tramadol was invented in the 1970s in Germany. Tramadol is different than other prescribed pain relievers like codeine or hydrocodone and is generally accepted as being less addictive although some people do become addicted to it. The drug has a similar effect as antidepressants particularly the medication Effexor which is a SSRI. Most often tramadol is prescribed to treat pain associated with different forms of neuralgia. Other conditions tramadol is prescribed for are restless leg syndrome, migraines, withdrawal of addictive medications, fibromyalgia, and OCD.

Tramadol may be the preferred drug for people suffering from chronic pain conditions because it is well tolerated without a huge risk of addition, serious side effects or overdose when used appropriately. However, there are dangers associated with tramadol. For instance many people who suddenly stop taking tramadol experience withdrawal symptoms. Tramadol is also a central nervous system depressant and shouldn’t be used in combination with other drugs that can depress the central nervous system. People who take tramadol should avoid taking alcohol, tranquilizers or any other drugs that can suppress breathing. This is how a tramadol overdose happens.

Some of the most common side effects of tramadol are:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Constipation

Withdrawal symptoms of tramadol are:

  • Sweating
  • Anxiety
  • Poor sleep
  • Pain and tremors

Anyone who takes tramadol for a long time should work with a doctor or a medical detox facility to begin a safe withdrawal from the medication.

Tramadol can be taken as capsules, tablets, suppositories and in injectable forms. Some of the types of tramadol include analgesics like acetaminophen or anti-inflammatory agents like aspirin. The recommended dose of tramadol is no more than 400mg a day. It is especially important to use tramadol exactly as prescribed for the length of time it is prescribed. It should never be shared with others or used in a manner unadvised by a doctor. Using tramadol other than prescribed is known as tramadol abuse.

Here are some signs of tramadol abuse:

  • Tramadol use resulting in a recurrent failure to fulfill work, school or home obligations
  • Tramadol use in physically hazardous situations such as driving or operating machinery
  • Tramadol use resulting in legal problems such as drug-related arrests
  • Continued use despite negative social or interpersonal consequences

Some of the symptoms of tramadol abuse are:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Euphoria
  • Shallow breathing
  • Dizziness
  • Constipation
  • Drowsiness or sedation

Physical tolerance can occur as the body becomes accustomed to tramadol; thus, more tramadol is needed to produce the original desired effect. Psychological dependence can occur as people believe that that they cannot function properly without tramadol. Individuals with a tolerance to tramadol are at risk of overdose due to the consumption of increased amounts of the drug.